What are Fungi?

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Overview:

Recently, the United Nations Biodiversity has urged people globally to use the word ‘funga’ whenever they say ‘flora and fauna’, in order to highlight the importance of fungi.

About Fungi: 

  • Fungi, along with Animalia (animals), Plantae (plants), Protista, Archaea/Archaebacteria, and Bacteria or Eubacteria form the six ‘kingdoms’ of biology.
  • They are eukaryotic organisms; i.e., their cells contain membrane-bound organelles and clearly defined nuclei.
  • Reproduction: Fungi usually reproduce both sexually and asexually. 
  • Distribution
    • Fungi are either terrestrial or aquatic, the latter living in freshwater or marine environments.
    • They are found in all temperate and tropical regions of the world where there is sufficient moisture to enable them to grow.
    • A few species of fungi live in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, although they are rare and are more often found living in symbiosis with algae in the form of lichens.
  • Importance of fungi
    • They help in breaking down dead organic material, they continue the cycle of nutrients through ecosystems.
    • Fungi, as food, play a role in human nutrition in the form of mushrooms.
    • They also act as agents of fermentation in the production of bread, cheeses, alcoholic beverages, and numerous other food preparations.
    • Secondary metabolites of fungi are used as medicines, such as antibiotics and anticoagulants. 

 


Q1) What are Prokaryotic organisms?

Prokaryotic organisms are a diverse group of microorganisms that lack a true cell nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles. They are known for their simplicity in cellular structure but are incredibly diverse in terms of their metabolic capabilities and ecological roles.

Source: Funga: UN wants us all to say it along with ‘Flora & Fauna’