World Schizophrenia Awareness Day, 2023

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Overview:

Recently, Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities (DEPwD) commemorated Schizophrenia to raise awareness and to reduce stigma around mental illness.

About Schizophrenia:    

  • Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe mental disorder that affects the way a person thinks, acts, expresses emotions, perceives reality, and relates to others.
  • It mostly affects young adults in the productive age group.
  • One in every 100 people experiences schizophrenia and men are twice as likely to develop this condition as compared to women.

Symptoms of Schizophrenia:

  • Schizophrenia symptoms can differ from person to person, but they generally fall into three main categories: psychotic, negative, and cognitive.
    • Psychotic symptoms include Hallucinations, Delusions, thought disorder, Movement disorder.
    • Negative symptoms include loss of motivation, loss of interest or enjoyment in daily activities, withdrawal from social life, difficulty showing emotions, and difficulty functioning normally.
    • Cognitive symptoms include problems in attention, concentration, and memory.

Risk factors for schizophrenia:

  • Genetics: Schizophrenia sometimes runs in families. However just because one family member has schizophrenia, it does not mean that other members of the family also will have it.
  • Environment: Research suggests that a combination of genetic factors and aspects of a person’s environment and life experiences may play a role in the development of schizophrenia.
  • Brain structure and function: Research shows that people with schizophrenia may be more likely to have differences in the size of certain brain areas and in connections between brain areas.

Treatment:

  • Though there is no cure for schizophrenia,
  • A variety of antipsychotic medications are effective in reducing the psychotic symptoms present in the acute phase of the illness.
  • Psychological treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy or supportive psychotherapy may reduce symptoms and enhance function.

 


Q1) What is an OCD person like?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic, and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts ("obsessions") and/or behaviors ("compulsions") that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over.

Source: World Schizophrenia Day: Towards awareness and acceptance